Pharmacy in History Editorial Team

Editor-in-Chief

Lucas Richert became the Editor-in-Chief of Pharmacy in History in 2019. He also serves as AIHP’s Historical Director.

Lucas is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy and the George Urdang Chair in the History of Pharmacy. Lucas was awarded graduate degrees from the University of Edinburgh and University of London after beginning his academic studies at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to joining UW-Madison, he was a Lecturer and then a Chancellor’s Fellow in the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare.

His research focuses on the history of substances and the pharmaceutical industry. He also examines the history of mental health. His first book, Conservatism, Consumer Choice, and the FDA during the Reagan Era: A Prescription for Scandal (Lexington Books 2014), studied pharmaceutical regulation in the 1970s-1980s. It was awarded the 2015 Arthur Miller Centre First Book Prize. His second book, Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs (McGill-Queen’s University Press, Spring 2019), investigates the myths, meanings, and boundaries of recreational drugs, palliative care drugs and pharmaceuticals as well as struggles over product innovation, consumer protection, and freedom of choice in the medical market place.

Email: lucas.richert@wisc.edu
Twitter: @LucRichert
Phone: 608-890-3676


AIHP Assistant Director Gregory Bond
Senior Editor

Gregory Bond, PhD, has been the Senior Editor and Managing Editor of Pharmacy in History since 2017. Greg received his PhD in American History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and subsequently received his MLS with concentrations in Archives and in Digital Libraries from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published peer-reviewed articles in scholarly journals and edited collections and has also written articles for popular publications, including the New York Times, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Wisconsin State Journal, and the History News Network.

His current research interests include the history of African-American pharmacists and the history of African-American pharmacy education. His recent publications, include:

Email: gregory.bond@aihp.org
Phone: 608-262-5378


Contributing Editor
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos is Wellcome Lecturer in History of Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, School of History, Classics and Archaeology. He studied pharmacy, ancient, and Byzantine history, before obtaining his PhD in 2015 from King’s College London. He is a specialist in the history of medicine and pharmacology in the medieval Mediterranean, with a particular focus on Byzantium and on the cultural exchanges between the Christian and Islamic worlds. He is currently working on a five-year Wellcome funded project “Making and Consuming Drugs in the Italian and Byzantine Worlds (12th-15th c.)”.

His first monograph, Innovation in Byzantine Medicine: The Writings of John Zacharias Aktouarios (c. 1275-c. 1330) (Oxford University Press, 2020), highlights the late Byzantine innovative contributions to the fields of physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutics. His forthcoming Routledge monograph provides the editio princeps and an English translation of four significant, previously unpublished, medieval Greek recipe books dated to between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries. He has also produced three edited volumes, including Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Galen, which constitutes the first reference work on this important but neglected subject.

Email: petros.bouras-vallianatos@ed.ac.uk


Contributing Editor
Kelly O’Donnell earned her PhD from Yale’s Program in the History of Science and Medicine, where she focused on the history of modern medicine and women’s history in the U.S. Her dissertation was a biography of journalist and women’s health activist Barbara Seaman, who famously/notoriously published The Doctors’ Case Against the Pill in 1969. Kelly was awarded her BA from Sarah Lawrence College in 2009. She was a research fellow at Drexel University College of Medicine’s Legacy Center in 2018 and was recently awarded a Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine, National Library of Medicine. For more information, visit her website.

Email: kellyodonnell@gmail.com


Contributing Editor
Jaipreet Virdi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of Delaware. She received a BA from York University, a MA and PhD from the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto. From 2015 to 2017, she was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario. She has received several fellowships and grants to support her work, including the Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Grant from the Medical History Library, Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library at Yale University and the New York Academy of Medicine Paul Klemperer Fellowship in the History of Medicine. In 2019 she was awarded the John C. Burnham Early Career Award from the History of Science Society Forum for the History of Human Science.

Jai’s research focuses on the history of medicine and disability history, especially pertaining to disability technologies and hearing loss. Her first book, Hearing Happiness: Deafness Cures in History (forthcoming, University of Chicago Press, 2020) rethinks how therapeutic negotiation and the influence of pseudo-medicine shaped what it means to be a “normal” deaf citizen in American history. Jai is also co-editor of Disability and the Victorians: Attitudes, Interventions, Legacies (forthcoming, Manchester University Press, 2020). She is currently working on a co-authored book with Dr. Coreen McGuire on the history of scientific research on deafness, nutrition deficiencies, and breathlessness, titled Instruments of Precision: Women Scientists and the Politics of Disability in Interwar Britain.

Email: jvirdi@udel.edu


Review Editor
Amelie Bonney is a DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford based at the History Faculty and the Wellcome Unit for History of Medicine. Her research analyzes medical and scientific debates over the properties of hazardous colors between 1830 and 1914 in France and Britain. It compares responses to the industrial hazards of color production and use in both countries and shows how issues of occupational health and environmental pollution became a means for medical men and scientists to strengthen their reputation and assert their expertise. It further highlights how theories of waste management and technological innovation were used to legitimize the creation of hazardous industries throughout the nineteenth century and beyond.

Amelie has taught courses relating to modern Europe and British History, including tutorials on the topics of “The authority of nature: race, heredity and crime, 1800-1940” as well as “Science and society in the nineteenth century” and “General history and philosophy of science/”.

Email: amelie.bonney@gtc.ox.ac.uk


Review Editor
Hilary Ingram is a Research Associate at Durham University in the School of Government and International Affairs (SGIA). She obtained a PhD in History from University College London, where her dissertation focused on the first generations of female doctors to qualify in Britain and pursue medical work overseas in Protestant missions. Prior to joining the research staff at Durham, Hilary held postdoctoral appointments at Keele University and the University of Nottingham, and she has taught courses by invitation in the history of medicine for Technische Universität Braunschweig. Working closely with Dr Anna Greenwood (Nottingham), she continues to research and publish on the international history of Boots the Chemists.

Email: hilary.j.ingram@durham.ac.uk


Review Editor
Ian Miller is lecturer in medical history at Ulster University. He has published various monographs and journal articles on areas including the history of the stomach, dietary change in post-Famine Ireland, and the medical ethical dimensions of hunger striking, with a focus on force-feeding. Recently, Ian published a textbook, Medical History, with Macmillan International. Ian has held visiting fellowships at the Max Planck Centre for the History of Emotions (Berlin), Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM (Paris) and the Institute for General Practice and Community Medicine (Oslo). Ian has also co-organised a major exhibition on hunger strike history at Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin, and has consulted on various television and film projects.

Email: i.miller@ulster.ac.uk

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