Sonnedecker Grant for Visiting Research in the History of Pharmacy

AIHP Director Glenn Sonnedecker, working in his office, 1970

Assistance for short-term historical research related to the history of pharmacy, including the history of drugs, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is available periodically. Historians, pharmacists, and other scholars working in the field (of any nationality) may apply for the next available Sonnedecker Grant for Visiting Research in the History of Pharmacy.

The program provides assistance for travel, maintaining temporary residence in Madison, and meeting research expenses associated with utilizing the collection. A brochure is available on request that describes the pharmaco-historical collections, which have been developed in Madison during more than a century by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, and the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy. Printed sources emphasize pharmaceutical literature of Western Europe and the United States, from the Renaissance to the present day. Manuscript sources represent mainly American pharmacy, from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These resources are reinforced by collections of comparable importance in the history of medicine and the history of science. Information about AIHP Collections in Madison .

At least $1,000 becomes available annually to defray part of the expenses of a recipient, for whatever period of residence is appropriate. Grants are made throughout the year on the basis of the merit of previous historical work and on the appropriateness of historical resources on the University of Wisconsin campus to the research proposed.

Recipients of the Sonnedecker Grant for Visiting Research in the History of Pharmacy are encouraged to submit to Pharmacy in History, AIHP’s quarterly journal, a manuscript or a more informal research note based on their research while in Madison.

To obtain further information, contact:

Dr. Gregory J. Higby, Director
American Institute of the History of Pharmacy
777 Highland Avenue
Madison, WI  53705-2222

Phone: 608-262-5378

Email: visitingscholar@aihp.org


Prof. Glenn Sonnedecker (left) consults rare books at the University of Wisconsin library with a graduate student

Brief Biography of Glenn Sonnedecker

The former Executive Director of the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy from 1957-1973 and 1981-1985, Glenn Sonnedecker is a pioneering historian of pharmacy. Sonnedecker received his Ph.D. in History of Science and History of Pharmacy from the University of Wisconsin in 1952, and he taught at the University of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy from 1952 to 1986. He was the founding editor of Pharmacy in History, AIHP’s quarterly journal, and has been the editor or author of more than  a dozen books and pamphlets and more than 100 articles on the history of pharmacy.

Fostering the creation, preservation, and dissemination of knowledge concerning the history of the pharmaceutical field.
AIHP News

AIHP Thanks the Charter Members of the National Pharmacy Association Sponsorship program


  • Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy, Patron

  • American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Patron

  • American College of Clinical Pharmacy, Donor

  • American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Contributor

  • American Pharmacists Association, Contributor

Read More
Subscribe

Join AIHP and Subscribe to Pharmacy in History

Individual Subscription
For $65/year ($75/foreign)

Institutional/Corporate subscription
For $130/year ($140/foreign)

Pharmacy Education Fund (Schools or College of Pharmacy)
For $275/year

Read More
AIHP News

Access the Pharmacy in History JSTOR Archive

All past issues of Pharmacy in History have been digitized and are text-searchable at JSTOR.

Read More
AIHP News

Sawyer Wins 2016 Sonnedecker Prize

AIHP is pleased to announce that Laura Phillips Sawyer, assistant Professor at Harvard Business School, has been selected to receive the 2016 Glenn Sonnedecker Prize for her article, “California Fair Trade: Antitrust and the Politics of ‘Fairness’ in U.S. Competition Policy.”

Read More